Criteria

Criteria

The Locke & Smith granite plaque is awarded to the state representative and state senator, who by their voting record, has voted in a manner consistent with limited government, personal responsibly, and individual freedom, as the U.S. and Missouri Constitution points out Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Legislators in MO have to swear an oath to defend both Constitutions so legislation will be reviewed accordingly when the need arises.

The basis of this award is nine questions; the following is the criteria used to determine the acceptability of changes to existing legislation or new legislation.

1.  Is this a PROPER function of government?

2.  Does the legislation create favoritism?

3.  Does the legislation create a favorable or negative impact?

4.  Does the legislation create a fee for service only to be provided by government?

5.  Does the legislation impact personal liberty or freedom?

6.  Does the legislation undermine personal responsibility?

7.  Does the legislation create a means by which government entities or the employees of such can abuse a tax payer approved tax or amendment?

8.  Can the legislation be currently enforced under existing laws?

9.  Does this legislation jeopardize in any manner the sovereignty of the state.

1.  Is this a PROPER function of government?

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,……..” ~Thomas Jefferson~

2.  Does the legislation create favoritism?

“That all constitutional government is intended to promote the general welfare of the people; that all persons have a natural right to life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and the enjoyment of the gains of their own industry; that all persons are created equal and are entitled to equal rights and opportunity under the law; that to give security to these things is the principal office of government, and that when government does not confer this security, it fails in its chief design.” ~Source: Const. of 1875, Art. II, § 4.~

3.  Does the legislation create a favorable or negative impact?

“That all political power is vested in and derived from the people; that all government of right originates from the people, is founded upon their will only, and is instituted solely for the good of the whole.” ~Source: Const. of 1875, Art. II, § 1.~

4.  Does the legislation create a fee for service only to be provided by government?

“Leaving aside, for a moment, the question of the divine origin of rights, it is obvious that a government is nothing more or less than a relatively small group of citizens who have been hired, in a sense, by the
rest of us to perform certain functions and discharge certain responsibilities which have been authorized. It stands to reason that the government itself has no innate power or privilege to do anything. Its only source of authority and power is from the people who have created it. This is made clear in the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States, which reads: “WE THE PEOPLE… do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”~Ezra Taft Benson~

5.  Does the legislation impact personal liberty or freedom?

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,……..” ~Thomas Jefferson~

6.  Does the legislation undermine personal responsibility?

“By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adversed to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.”
“Extend the sphere, and you take in a greater variety of parties and interests; you make it less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens; or if such a common motive exists, it will be more difficult for all who feel it to discover their own strength, and to act in unison with each other.” ~James Madison~

7.  Does the legislation create a means by which government entities or the employees of such can abuse a tax payer approved tax or amendment?

“By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adversed to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.” ~James Madison~

8.  Can the legislation be currently enforced under existing laws?

“That all constitutional government is intended to promote the general welfare of the people; that all persons have a natural right to life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and the enjoyment of the gains of their own industry; that all persons are created equal and are entitled to equal rights and opportunity under the law; that to give security to these things is the principal office of government, and that when government does not confer this security, it fails in its chief design.” ~Source: Const. of 1875, Art. II, § 4.~

9.  Does this legislation jeopardize in any manner the sovereignty of the state.

“TO understand political power right, and derive it from its original, we must consider, what state all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.”

“A state also of equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more than another; there being nothing more evident, than that creatures of the same species and rank, promiscuously born to all the same advantages of nature, and the use of the same faculties, should also be equal one amongst another without subordination or subjection, unless the lord and master of them all should, by any manifest declaration of his will, set one above another, and confer on him, by an evident and clear appointment, an undoubted right to dominion and sovereignty.” ~John Locke~